Sunday, June 15, 2014
urbanfunscape:

An Elevator For Cyclists In Trondheim http://ift.tt/1iAG8L9

urbanfunscape:

An Elevator For Cyclists In Trondheim http://ift.tt/1iAG8L9

Sunday, June 1, 2014
We like to be out in nature so much because it has no opinion about us. Friedrich Nietzsche (via h-o-r-n-g-r-y)

(Source: sisyphean-revolt)

Thursday, May 29, 2014
urbendisaster:

thisbigcity:

After spending €15bn on over 2,000 new trains, The French train operator SNCF discovered they were too wide for thousands of platforms across the country. Those platforms are now being remodelled. 

Face. Palm.

urbendisaster:

thisbigcity:

After spending €15bn on over 2,000 new trains, The French train operator SNCF discovered they were too wide for thousands of platforms across the country. Those platforms are now being remodelled

Face. Palm.

Sunday, May 18, 2014
thislandisparkland:

What Vancouver’s Mid Main Park Can Teach Us About Small Parks
I love tiny parks—the more itty-bitty the better—and when I was back in Vancouver recently, I made sure I went to visit the relatively new Mid Main Park at Main and 18th Street done by Hapa Collaborative. I had been watching the design process from my perch in Toronto and was excited to see what it looked like in person. In short, the park is awesome, and it can teach us a lot about how to create great small parks.
There are a few reasons why this park is great. One is that it uses its space incredibly well, creating different rooms in a pretty tiny park by changing the elevations, using curved pathways, and incorporating distinct design elements in different places. It’s also located at an interesting bend in Main Street and creates a nice place to stop and people watch.
The other reason though is found in the whimsy of its design. As this recent post in the excellent blog The Dirt points out, the design of the park was meant to evoke the feel of a nearby ice cream shop that had closed in the 1980s. The park includes candy-red stools, a sculpture that resembles bendy straws, long concrete benches, and a small grassy knoll. Too many times, small parks are left as a patch of grass with a bench or two when they can be so much more. Dare to dream big, tiny parks!
The final reason is that the park is also an excellent example of what can happen when a city reclaims under-utilized roadway for park space. The design called for the closing of a slip lane on the western portion. Closing this lane and turning it into part of the park allowed this piece of public space to be stitched back into the city.
image from Hapa Collaborative

thislandisparkland:

What Vancouver’s Mid Main Park Can Teach Us About Small Parks

I love tiny parks—the more itty-bitty the better—and when I was back in Vancouver recently, I made sure I went to visit the relatively new Mid Main Park at Main and 18th Street done by Hapa Collaborative. I had been watching the design process from my perch in Toronto and was excited to see what it looked like in person. In short, the park is awesome, and it can teach us a lot about how to create great small parks.

There are a few reasons why this park is great. One is that it uses its space incredibly well, creating different rooms in a pretty tiny park by changing the elevations, using curved pathways, and incorporating distinct design elements in different places. It’s also located at an interesting bend in Main Street and creates a nice place to stop and people watch.

The other reason though is found in the whimsy of its design. As this recent post in the excellent blog The Dirt points out, the design of the park was meant to evoke the feel of a nearby ice cream shop that had closed in the 1980s. The park includes candy-red stools, a sculpture that resembles bendy straws, long concrete benches, and a small grassy knoll. Too many times, small parks are left as a patch of grass with a bench or two when they can be so much more. Dare to dream big, tiny parks!

The final reason is that the park is also an excellent example of what can happen when a city reclaims under-utilized roadway for park space. The design called for the closing of a slip lane on the western portion. Closing this lane and turning it into part of the park allowed this piece of public space to be stitched back into the city.

image from Hapa Collaborative

Graduating from an HBCU on the 60th anniversary of the Brown vs. Board of Education ruling; makes me proud of the steps my country has taken (albeit too slowly) to destroy hate.

p0kemina:

crunchthedestroyer:

askjeansplice:

angelclark:

ENDLESS ELECTRICITY: Here’s A Way Of Turning America’s Roads Into Gigantic Solar Panels

There are about 31,251 square miles of roads, parking lots, driveways, playgrounds, bike paths, and sidewalks in the lower 48 states. If Julie and Scott Brusaw have their way, they will all someday be replaced with solar panels.

For the better part of a decade, the Idaho couple has been working on prototyping an industrial-strength panel that could withstand the weight of even the largest trucks. They now appear to have cracked the formula, developing a specially textured glass coating for the panels that can not only bear tremendous loads but also support standard tire traction.

By their reckoning, at peak installation their panelized roads could produce more than three times the electricity consumed in the U.S.

The material could power electric vehicles through a receiver plate mounted beneath the vehicle and a transmitter plate is installed in the road.

THIS IS UNBELIEVABLY IMPORTANT AND UNBELIEVABLY DISAPPOINTING THAT IT’S GOTTEN SUCH LITTLE ATTENTION.

PEOPLE THINK ABOUT IT, JUST HOW MANY ROADS THERE ARE ALL OVER THE WORLD AND HOW MUCH ENERGY COULD BE PRODUCED USING THESE LIKE SERIOUSLY “THREE TIMES THE ELECTRICITY CONSUMED IN THE U.S”. IT’S NOT JUST GOING TO HELP REDUCE THE AMOUNTS OF GREEN HOUSE EMISSIONS, IT’S GOING TO CREATE JOBS IN THE COUNTRIES IT’S USED IN. IT HAS SO MUCH EXTRA STUFF IT’S UNBELIEVABLE HOW AMAZING THE ROAD COULD BE.

THESE PEOPLE ARE SAINTS, THEY’VE WORKED THEIR BUTTS OFF AND VOLUNTEERS HAVE WORKED JUST AS HARD TO GET TO THIS LEVEL BUT THEY STILL HAVE JUST UNDER $ 800,000 TO RAISE IN 15 DAYS.

THIS SORTA STUFF IS HOW WE’RE GOING TO CREATE A GREENER EARTH AND IT’S BEEN VIRTUALLY IGNORED BY TUMBLR. WE NEED TO SUPPORT THIS STUFF AND THESE SORTS OF PEOPLE WHO SELFLESSLY DEDICATE THEIR WORK TO CREATING A BETTER WORLD.

PLEASASASASASSSSSSEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE PEOPLE NEED TO SEE THIS.

Science-Pone has spoken

Capitalist piggies need to figure out how they’re going to make money out of this and wait for all the coal deposits to be exhausted before they let anyone take notice of this awesome fucking idea.

Friday, May 16, 2014

policymic:

Here’s what your city would look like under rising sea levels

A new website called "World Under Water" will help you with just that. The site, created by environmental crowdfunding platform Carbon Story, combines Google Street View images with wave graphics to demonstrate how rising sea levels might affect the world’s most famous landmarks — as well as your own backyard.

Read more | Follow policymic 

(Source: micdotcom)

Thursday, May 15, 2014
Monday, May 12, 2014
punkrockluna:

ilovecharts:

Hours Worked On Minimum Wage In Order To Pay For One University Credit Hour

*Flings this chart at baby boomers*

punkrockluna:

ilovecharts:

Hours Worked On Minimum Wage In Order To Pay For One University Credit Hour

*Flings this chart at baby boomers*